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Category Archives — Gfycat

Gfycat starts rolling out 360 degree GIF content – TechCrunch

GIFs offer a way to compress a ton of information into a small amount of space, and while Gfycat has positioned itself as more of a short-form video centric platform, it’s going to take a step further to see what a step beyond a standard GIF looks like.

The company today said it would be rolling out 360 degree GIF-like short form videos, which will allow users to plant themselves in the middle of what is effectively a looping video like a GIF. While that presents much more of a challenge to users for generating content, CEO Richard Rabbat said the proliferation of tools like 3D cameras and content from the actual producers like video studios would make it an increasingly popular way to interact with short-form content in a compact form factor.

“We’ve always thought that GIFs are amazing from many perspectives,” Rabbat said. “That goes beyond whether you’re looking at the content to use it in messaging, or you’re consuming it for entertainment value, or you’re using it for decoration in the case of the augmented reality effort we’re working on. We want people to really get excited about how they consume the content to the point where they can see the subjects of the content in a much more lifelike way, and really get excited about that.”

It’s not going to be all that unfamiliar from 360 degree videos you might find on Facebook or other platforms. Users on desktop can use their mouse to move a GIF around, while on mobile devices users can pan their phone around in order to see different parts of the GIF. The idea is to give users a way to have a more robust interaction with a piece of content like a GIF in a compact experience without having to strap on a VR headset or anything along those lines.

The company is starting off by rolling out some 360 degree content from Paramount, which is producing 360 degree content around its Mission Impossible films. And while a lot of content on Gfycat — or other platforms — comes from shows, movies or games along those lines, it makes more sense for those studios to use these kinds of tools to increase awareness for their shows or movies.

via Gfycat

There are a lot of companies working on figuring out the best messaging experiences around GIFs. But Google acquiring Tenor, a GIF search tool that works across multiple platforms, may have set a bare minimum bar for the value of companies that are looking to help users share GIFs with their friends. Gfycat positions itself as something that’s geared toward more creator tools, and recently said it hit 180 million monthly active users.

“We’re creating experiences that we think are going to enable others and inspire others to create that same kind of content,” Rabbat said.” We expect it’s going to be a subset of what people do with 2D, but a much more immersive experience where people will spend more time looking at the content. From a consumption perspective, by not requiring people to put on VR headsets, we’re making it much more consumer friendly.”

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Gfycat ramps up its focus on game clips and highlights as it hits 180M monthly users – TechCrunch

Gfycat is already a pretty popular host for lots of content like short clips from shows and movies, but there’s also a pretty substantial store of content centered around gaming — which is why the company is starting to put some extra focus on it.

Gfycat, which is centered around creator tools to make those short-form video clips and GIFs, said it’s going to create an interface specifically designed for gamers. Called “Gfycat for gaming,” the startup hopes to ride both the wave of ever-omnipresent GIFs getting shared around the internet and popular, highly shareable game titles like PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds and Rocket League. GIFs serve as a pretty good vehicle for delivering highlight reel clips for those games, which is why it’s going to be putting some extra focus on that audience. Gaming is one of the most popular verticals on Gfycat, CEO Richard Rabbat said.

“As we were looking at different verticals, gaming is such a strong vertical, and we wanted gamers to get an experience that just really speaks to what they’re looking for,” he said. “We wanted to just focus on that as opposed to content that was much more mixed. You see a lot of teams or players that will play for hours, but that exciting moment was like 10 seconds or 20 seconds. They want to capture them and keep them, to chat about them, and share them.”

While the platforms are certainly a big component of this, creator tools for getting that content onto the Internet is also a pretty big segment. That’s what Gfycat focuses on, and the company says it has 180 million monthly active users, which is up from 130 million monthly active users in October last year. The service has more than 500 million page views every month, Rabbat said.

There are two changes that are coming with this update: first, there will be a direct home for gaming highlights on Gfycat, where users can follow creators in that area; second, the time limit for Gfycat clips is growing to around 60 seconds instead of just 15, which is a soft change the company made in the past few months. Both are geared toward making content more shareable in order to grab those highlights, which might not just fall into 15 second buckets. Down the line, the company will start working on subscribing to specific channel.

“A lot of gaming moments are created in 10 or 15 seconds,” Rabbat said. “Some of the gamers have been asking us for a longer period. We moved from 15 seconds to 60 seconds so people can share exciting experiences that take a little more time. GIFs are not only just a moment but also it’s a bit of storytelling. We wanted people to have the ability to do that storytelling.”

GIFs are already a big market, and there has even been some activity from the major players looking to dive further into that type of content. Earlier this month, Google acquired Tenor, a GIF platform that has its own keyboard and integrates with a variety of messenger services — even ones like LinkedIn. That a tool like Tenor or Giphy has grown to encompass all those messaging tools is just a further example of how much of an opportunity platforms centered around GIFs have.

The short-form video clips, as Gfycat likes to label them, are a good form factor for compressing a lot of information into a unit of content that’s easy to share among friends or an audience on the Internet. Rather than just sending a text message, a GIF can convey some element of emotion alongside just the typical information or response some user is trying to achieve. That’s led to a big boom for those companies, with Tenor hitting 12 billion GIF searches every month as an example.

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Gfycat looks to be a hub of content for AR experience development – TechCrunch

If all goes well, some GIF creators may start seeing their GIFs show up in augmented reality experiences, based on a new deal that’s happening with Gfycat this morning.

Gfycat said it would be working with a company called Metaverse that, like many tools of its kind, is looking to make it easier to build applications in a more plug-and-play matter — this time for building augmented reality apps. Gfycat has more than 130 million monthly active users and in particular gears its tools toward creators, and this could be another step in helping those creators get their content out to the masses as activity in augmented reality starts to continue to pick up. It’s certainly not that pretty right now, but these small agreements can sometimes be the start of increasingly robust toolsets for developers.

To be sure, there’s a number of caveats. The most obvious one is that the GIFs created by those creators have to have a transparent background. After all, it would be weird for them to show up in the real world with a weird kind of background that blocks off the rest of reality and kind of sack the whole “augmented reality” concept. But at the same time, it does start to offer a kind of pseudo-home for creators that are looking to crack into AR as well as also offering developers looking to build games or other apps and opportunity to have easy access to content to get started.

We’ve seen from the explosion of games like Pokémon Go and others that augmented reality games are increasingly going to be A Thing. Niantic may have created a pivotal use case for that with a strong brand, but while looking a bit janky right now, it’s possible that a simple game developer might figure out some niche use case in AR that will actually blow up. That starts with having access to good content, and something like this would help get them started.

All this might be completely moot if Apple and others roll out an increasingly simple interface for AR app development like more robust tools in ARkit, where developers would just sidestep platforms like Metaverse in order to just build their own interfaces. But having a hub of content to start from is also an important step in figuring out where to even begin.

The GIF space is increasingly blowing up. We’ve already talked about how a bunch of these major platforms are continuing to grow with Giphy saying it has 300 million daily active users. Tenor, another GIF platform, meanwhile nets around 12 billion searches a month for its own GIFs.

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Giphy held talks to raise a massive new funding round

We’re hearing from a number of sources that Giphy, the big platform for hosting GIFs that also runs a GIF keyboard, held talks to raise a huge new financing round — though it’s not clear if it ever crossed the finish line.

Sources pegged the round at something as high as around $100 million, but that may have changed over time. We’ve been hearing about this for some time now, and whispers of this seem to have started a few months ago. As always, it’s possible that the talks may have changed over time. In the end, Giphy may have not have gone with financing at all, and for the time being, we’re hearing that nothing is imminent. Giphy last raised $72 million at a reported $600 million valuation at the end of 2016.

But the consumer investing environment isn’t necessarily dead, or even in purgatory, right now. HQ Trivia, for example, was able to raise $15 million at a $100 million valuation. This comes amid a time when the GIF space at large seems to be heating up. Given that the space seems to be growing quickly, it makes sense to try to raise additional capital in order to secure the right partnerships — and also get the right talent on board to optimize the experience so users are getting the right GIFs at the right moments and keep coming back to the platform over and over again. Given the growth, and that the business model isn’t fully fleshed out, it makes sense that Giphy could use some additional cash.

The apps in the space clearly have momentum. Giphy says it has 300 million daily active users — which, depending on who you ask in the Valley, could have a number of different interpretations. One of Giphy’s competitors, Tenor, points to searches on its platform as a success metric — saying that it hit 12 billion GIF searches in February. Gfycat, meanwhile, is positioning itself as a company geared around creator tools with mechanisms that optimize the fidelity of the inbound GIF, which also says it has around 130 million monthly active users. Gfycat raised $10 million in 2016, while Tenor (formerly Riffsy) raised $10 million in 2015.

It also presents a unique opportunity for all these platforms to start thinking about sponsored content. For example, if you open up a GIF search engine inside of a keyboard, one of these companies could plant a sponsored GIF right inside the search rail. Should it be sticky enough and hit the right sweet spot, it could get incredibly high share counts, and as a result offer a lot of reach for those companies looking to make GIFs.

This kind of branded content model is usually tied in with messaging, but GIFs could offer leagues more engagement than the average ad — which is what advertisers are looking for.

You’ll find a lot of Gfycat links around the internet, but some of the most fertile ground for these platforms exists within the various messenger platforms. Facebook Messenger, for example, uses these platforms more or less indiscriminately — switching between services relatively easily as it looks to just optimize the user experience and give them the best content. But for iMessage, for example, users install a specific keyboard. Neither of these apps are exactly blockbusters (nor should they be compared to apps like Facebook).

Here’s the Giphy app, where you can search for GIFs and copy them and such, for the last 90 days:

GIFs are increasingly popular, partly thanks to their ability to compress a ton of information into a short clip. This compression allows for punchy, memorable communication, which is great for messaging, but also great for ads.

While you could easily write out a text that tries to translate that information, searching for a GIF that translates not just the text but also the kind of subtext offers a ton of value. It’s thanks to that these platforms have risen to such prominence — both with Giphy’s own 300 million daily active user number and Tenor’s 12 billion monthly searches number. They take different approaches to measuring their success, but the point remains that this represents a pretty massive opportunity.

We reached out to Giphy several times for comment, but did not hear back. We’ll update the story when we hear back from them.

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